American Witch Hazel

Hamamelis virginiana

American Witch Hazel has it all: great fall color, winter interest, a large vase shape, fragrant flowers, and fruit for the birds. New leaves emerge reddish-bronze in the spring, and turn a brilliant …

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Plants 1 Gallon Pot Sold Out
1+ $29.99 ea.
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SKU
94090-GL
Cultural Details
Soil Type Clay, Loam, Sand
Soil Moisture Dry, Medium, Moist
Sun Exposure Full Sun, Partial, Shade
Height 10' - 20'
Bloom Color Yellow
Bloom Time Sep, Oct, Nov
Spacing 10'
Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Root Type Fibrous
Benefits Birds, Pollinators, Host Plant

American Witch Hazel has it all: great fall color, winter interest, a large vase shape, fragrant flowers, and fruit for the birds. New leaves emerge reddish-bronze in the spring, and turn a brilliant gold in the fall. Despite its stunning fall leaf color, Witch Hazel is best known for its fringed yellow flowers which appear in late fall and stay on the branches long after the leaves have dropped. Even in the cold Midwest, the blooms persist into November and beyond.

A large native shrub, Hamamelis Virginia often has a multi-stemmed trunk with spreading branches that form an irregular, open crown. Mature plants can reach heights of 25 feet, however 12 to 15 feet is typical. Long-lived, Witch Hazel performs best on moist sites but handles most soils, growing equally well in well-drained top soil and poorly drained clay. Extremely dry situations are best avoided. As a woodland understory shrub it prefers some shade but it will grow in full sun as well.

Flowering starts when the plant is about six years old. The flowers are self-fertile and pollination is carried out by small flies and bees, foraging late in the season, along with several species of Eupsilia moths - known as winter moths - which are active on cold nights. Once pollinated the flowers go dormant for the winter, and mature the following year, taking a full season for the seed to reach maturity. The mature seeds open suddenly, with a popping sound, and are jetted to a distance of up to 30 feet from the mother tree. In the woodland this seed dispersal results in a lovely an understory grove.

Other common names include Winterbloom, Snapping Hazelnut and Striped Alder.