Stiff Goldenrod

Solidago rigida

Stiff Goldenrod is a widely adaptable species, thriving in the most inhospitable soils, and a range of conditions from clay to dry sand. A glowing beauty in the autumn landscape, the flowers are favorite of Monarch butterflies as they fuel-up for their fall migration …

More Detail
In stock
SKU
38770-03 / 18770
Plants 3" Pots Sold Out
1-4 $7.99 ea.
5-10 $6.99 ea.
11-31 $5.99 ea.
32+ $4.99 ea.
Seeds 46,000 seeds/oz
1/4 Oz $8.00
1/2 Oz $12.00
Oz $20.00
Lb $300.00
Cultural Details
Soil Type Clay, Loam, Sand
Soil Moisture Dry, Medium
Sun Exposure Full Sun
Height 3' - 5'
Bloom Color Yellow
Bloom Time Aug, Sep
Spacing 1'
Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Root Type Fibrous
Benefits Birds, Butterflies, Pollinators, Host Plant, Deer Resistant
Seeds per Oz 46000
Propagation Treatment Dry Stratification
Direct Sowing Time Spring, Early Summer, Fall

Stiff Goldenrod is a widely adaptable species, thriving in a range of soils from clay to dry sand. A glowing beauty in the autumn landscape, the flowers are favorite of Monarch butterflies as they fuel-up for their fall migration. Songbirds love to perch on the stems of Stiff Goldenrod, and take advantage of the abundant seed in the fall.

Goldenrods are keystone species in ecoregions across North America, and play an influential role in system biodiversity. Pollen, nesting sites, and a critical source of late season nectar are available in abundance for bees, butterflies and other insects. Goldenrod gall flies lay their eggs in the plant stem and the developing larvae are a rich source of protein for chickadees and woodpeckers in the middle of winter. Numerous small moths use this goldenrod as a larval host plant, including the Wavy-Lined Emerald, and Green Leuconycta moths.

Stiff Goldenrod self-seeds readily, which may not be desirable for smaller settings. Removal of the seed heads is a reliable way to control unwanted spread.

Botanical Synonyms
Oligoneuron rigidum
Planting and Cultivation Notes
Goldenrods are often mistakenly blamed as the cause of hay fever - an allergic reaction to wind-borne pollen. But they, and most native wildflowers, do not have wind-borne pollen. Instead, the pollen is moved from bloom to bloom by bees, butterflies and other pollinators.