Short Toothed Mountain Mint

Pycnanthemum muticum
Pycnanthemum muticum is easy to grow in almost any average to fertile, well-drained soil. It grows well in partial shade, but the best flowering will occur in full sun. Its compact growth, broad lustruous leaves, silvery bracts and aromatic flowers …
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Plants $3.99 - $6.99
Availability: In stock
SKU
37650-03
Cultural Details
Soil Type Clay, Loam
Soil Moisture Dry, Medium, Moist
Sun Exposure Full Sun, Partial
Height 2' - 3'
Bloom Color Pink
Bloom Time July, Aug, Sep
Spacing 2'
Zones 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Root Type Rhizome
Benefits Butterflies, Pollinators, Deer Resistant

Pycnanthemum muticum is easy to grow in almost any average to fertile, well-drained soil. It grows well in partial shade, but the best flowering will occur in full sun. Its compact growth, broad lustruous leaves, silvery bracts and aromatic flowers make it a highly popular member of the perennial flower garden. This mountain mint offers excellent pollinator support for both butterflies and bees. Other common names include Blue Mountain Mint, Blunt Mountain Mint or Clustered Mountain Mint.

Short Toothed Mountain Mint is a vigorous grower and colony-forming (spreads by rhizome) in optimum conditions. It is not as aggressive as many of the true mints and is best managed by giving it some room to roam and combining it with plants that will stand their ground, such as Bergamot and Goldenrods. Purple coneflower intermingles beautifullly. For grass combinations try Tufted Hairgrass, Switchgrass, or a clump of Big Bluestem. Avoid combining it with shorter, less stalwart species. If naturalizing is unwanted the roots can be pruned in spring with a spade to control spreading. Otherwise, any newly spreading plants are easily pulled in the spring.

Planting and Cultivation Notes
Short Toothed Mountain Mint is a vigorous grower and colony-forming (spreads by rhizome) in optimum conditions. It is not as aggressive as many of the true mints and is best managed by giving it some room to roam and combining it with plants that will stand their ground, such as Bergamot and Goldenrods. Purple coneflower intermingles beautifullly. For grass combinations try Tufted Hairgrass, Switchgrass, or a clump of Big Bluestem. Avoid combining it with shorter, less stalwart species. If naturalizing is unwanted the roots can be pruned in spring with a spade to control spreading. Otherwise, any newly spreading plants are easily pulled in the spring.