Northern Bush Honeysuckle

Diervilla lonicera

Bush Honeysuckle, Diervilla lonicera, has dense, dark green foliage that turns yellow-orange, then red to purple in the autumn. The color will be more dramatic on plantings that receive more sunlight. Not a true honeysuckle, this small, mound-shaped shrub will …

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SKU
93150-GL
Cultural Details
Soil Type Loam, Sand
Soil Moisture Dry, Medium
Sun Exposure Full Sun, Partial, Shade
Height 1' - 3'
Bloom Color Yellow, Orange
Bloom Time June, July, Aug
Spacing 2' - 3'
Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Root Type Rhizome
Benefits Birds, Pollinators, Host Plant

Bush Honeysuckle, Diervilla lonicera, has dense, dark green foliage that turns yellow-orange, then red to purple in the autumn. The color will be more dramatic on plantings that receive more sunlight. Not a true honeysuckle, this small, mound-shaped shrub will spread to form thickets over time, making it a good choice for massing, hedgerows or shrub borders. The yellow honeysuckle-shaped flowers, which turn reddish in color as they mature, attract butterflies and other pollinators. The fruit capsules are desirable to many songbirds, autumn through winter. Also a larval host for the Fawn Sphinx Moth.

This drought tolerant native shrub adapts easily to poor, rocky soils. Northern Bush Honeysuckle (Diervilla sp.) is not to be confused with invasive honeysuckles. Morrow's honeysuckle, Tatarian honeysuckle, Amur honeysuckle, and Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.) are all invasive and non-native species. The native and invasive honeysuckles are somewhat similar in appearance. One way to distinguish between them is by looking at the stems - native honeysuckles have solid stems while invasive honeysuckles have hollow stems.

Planting and Cultivation Notes
Diervilla lonicera has "perfect flowers," which means that both male and female parts are contained on a single flower. The male and female flower parts develop in sequence, and the flowers themselves are self-infertile. Two-to-three plants are recommended for a reliable fruiting.