Purple Flowering Raspberry

Rubus odoratus

Purple Flowering Raspberry is an ornamental native shrub, prized for the purple flowers that bloom profusely in early summer and continue throughout the season. The attractive maple-like leaves look good all season long and turn pale yellow in the fall …

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SKU
97940-GL
Cultural Details
Soil Type Loam, Sand
Soil Moisture Medium, Moist
Sun Exposure Full Sun, Partial, Shade
Height 5' - 8'
Bloom Color Pink, Purple
Bloom Time June, July, Aug
Spacing 3' - 6'
Hardiness Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Root Type Rhizome
Benefits Birds, Pollinators, Host Plant, Deer Resistant

Purple Flowering Raspberry (Rubus odoratus) is an ornamental native shrub, prized for the purple flowers that bloom profusely in early summer and continue throughout the season. The attractive maple-like leaves look good all season long and turn pale yellow in the fall. A thornless raspberry, Rubus odoratus has hairy stems but no prickles. The fragrant colorful blooms host a flurry of pollinators, and the large fruit that follows is highly sought by a variety of birds and other wildlife. As for human consumption, the fruit lacks the sweetness and flavor of its bramble cousins.

The flowers of Rubus odoratus are somewhat self-fertile, which means that a single shrub will produce some fruit. It prefers medium to moist, well-drained soils, but also tolerates a wide range of adverse conditions and has good shade tolerance as well.

This long-lived shrub is mounded and thicket-forming. It forms a large attractive patch and is best situated where it has plenty of room to spread. Otherwise you will need to stay vigilant to control suckering. That said, large adjacent plants, pathways and lawn may be employed to curtail the plants’ suckering tendencies. Found in moist, partial shade at woodland edges it grows natively throughout the eastern United States and the Allegheny regions. It is fairly common in the Catskills where it is reportedly spectacular in bloom. Its status is endangered in Illinois and threatened in Indiana.

Planting and Cultivation Notes
The flowers of Rubus odorata are somewhat self-fertile, which means that a single shrub will produce some fruit, but not as abundantly as when two or three of the shrubs are present.