Mayapple

Podophyllum peltatum

Mayapple is sometimes referred to as the Umbrella Plant because of its large, palmate leaves. The leaves unfurl in spring and shelter a single, fragrant white flower located in the 'Y' of the stem. The flowers are beneficial for a variety of …

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Plants Bare Root
1-4 $7.99 ea.
5-10 $6.99 ea.
11-31 $5.99 ea.
32+ $4.99 ea.
Availability: In stock
SKU
76960-03
Cultural Details
Soil Type Clay, Loam, Sand
Soil Moisture Dry, Medium
Sun Exposure Partial, Shade
Height 1' - 2'
Bloom Color White
Bloom Time May, June
Spacing 1' - 2'
Zones 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Root Type Rhizome
Benefits Pollinators

Mayapple is sometimes referred to as the Umbrella Plant because of its large, palmate leaves. The leaves unfurl in spring and shelter a single, fragrant white flower located in the 'Y' of the stem. The flowers are beneficial for a variety of early season pollinators.

As a woodland native, Mayapple does in any well-drained soil in shade to partial sun, and is known to grow well under some pines. Planted two feet apart, the plants can creep to form a solid 1 - 2 foot high groundcover in two seasons. After blooming, the mayapple flower produces a yellow apple-like fruit. When the fruit ripens and softens the weight of the fruit eventually causes the senescing stalk to bend over and set the fruit on the ground. The plants are dormant later in the summer.

The "apple" emits a fruity aroma that is attractive to box turtles. The consumed fruit and seeds pass through the turtle's digestive system to be deposited away from the parent plant. Studies show that seeds transported by turtles have 40% higher germination success than those simply left on the ground. There is some evidence that other mammals, such as the opossum and racoon, may also disperse the seed. Note: The fruit and plant parts are poisonous to humans in large amounts.

Explore our Resources & Guides: How to Transplant Bare Root Plants

Planting and Cultivation Notes
We recommend planting ephemerals in early fall while the soil is still warm, or in early spring. Spring installations will have some time to develop before summer dormancy, but will not produce flowers the first year. An early fall planting allows the roots time to establish properly before winter, and gives the plants a stronger start the following spring. This woodland species appreciates a generous application of leaf mulch in the fall.