Sharp-Lobed Hepatica

Hepatica acutiloba

Hepatica acutiloba is an ephemeral and one of the earliest woodland wildflowers to appear in spring. Lavender-to-white flowers bob in the wind on their slender stems. The fuzzy stems and 3-lobed floral …

More Detail
Plants Bare Root
1-4 $7.99 ea.
5-10 $6.99 ea.
11-31 $5.99 ea.
32+ $4.99 ea.
Availability: In stock
SKU
74010-03
Cultural Details
Soil Type Loam, Sand
Soil Moisture Medium, Moist
Sun Exposure Partial
Height 3" - 6"
Bloom Color White, Lavender, Pink
Bloom Time Apr, May
Spacing 6"
Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
Root Type Corm

Hepatica acutiloba is an ephemeral and one of the earliest woodland wildflowers to appear in spring. Lavender-to-white flowers bob in the wind on their slender stems. The fuzzy stems and 3-lobed floral bracts are a trademark, along with distintinctive basal leaves that are mottled green and also have three lobes. The leaves turn a wine color after the bloom, and persist thru the fall and winter.

Native to the woodlands in the eastern half of the United States, Sharp Lobed Hepatica can be found growing in high quality wooded areas where the original flora is largely intact. Hepaticas serve some of the earliest pollinators of spring. Pollination is carried out by various small solitary bees that collect pollen from the flowers, along with Syrphid or other flies that feed on the pollen. The flowers don’t provide nectar.

Growing Hepatica in the garden requires a location with dappled sunlight in early spring and light shade during the summer. The best soil will be well-drained and loamy. Rocky material can also be present. The plants will need a layer of decaying leaves as a year-round mulch.

Explore our Resources & Guides: How to Transplant Bare Root Plants  

Botanical Synonyms
Hepatica nobilis var. acuta
Planting and Cultivation Notes
We recommend planting ephemerals in early fall while the soil is still warm, or in early spring. Spring installations will have some time to develop before summer dormancy, but will not produce flowers the first year. An early fall planting allows the roots time to establish properly before winter, and gives the plants a stronger start the following spring. This woodland species appreciates a generous application of leaf mulch in the fall.